Make Your Own Cydia Jailbreak Apps or Tweaks with Free iOSOpenDev for Mac OS X

iOSOpenDev tool offers new possibilities for creating jailbreak tweaks for iPhone and iPad. The utility allows the developers to create third-party apps using Xcode package. The Xcode is originally utilized for creating official iOS and Mac OS X applications but was also used as a core of iOSOpenDev. The community of Cydia developers created tweaks and software for jailbroken devices for years and used to be at the Cydia developers Olympus. There was only small portion of guides on the net and only the most talented and experienced developers could release tweaks for Cydia that worked fine with iOS. iOSOpenDev release changed the whole picture pretty much as the new installer includes Xcode templates that allow developing of jailbreak tools in familiar and comfortable environment.

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Install iPhone Custom Fonts [How-To]

Tired of your iPhone’s look and want to change it immediately? There are bunch of iPhone hacks for that! One of the awesome things you can do is to install a custom font hack on your iPhone. Probably you’ve already read some documents or blogs describing how to use custom fonts and added some info to .plist but nothing worked? Attempted to use them both in code and in Interface Builder but still no luck?

iPhone Custom Fonts 1

I had the same problems with installing iPhone custom fonts but managed to solve them. Actually, to do  that you just have to grab some zipped fonts, unzip them. If by unzipping font files are 0 kb try StuffIt Expander for unzipping. After successfully unzipping them you will be able to install those fonts into Font Book of your iDevice.

Here are the steps how to install iPhone custom fonts:

1. You will need to convert the font by using Fondu (http://fondu.sourceforge.net/)

2. After installing Fondu run the Rosetta install (here’s a Snow Leopard how to: http://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/snow_leopard_installing_rosetta/)

3. Run terminal and choose the directory where the font lies. Type fondu %font name%. You will get the message asking if you want to save the font. Choose Yes.

4. Now open XCode, add pfb into your project. After that go to info.plist and add a file to UIAppFonts (together with .pfb extension)

I performed the test in the UITableViewCell. cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont fontWithName:@”[font file]” size:30]; // do not include .pfb extension.

The font displays just fine. It could require a .ttf file but on the test .pfb also looked just fine. Everything should work fine. If not – please comment.

Additionally: when adding UIAppFonts .plist array as described above there’s a possibility (try to use it) of adding a breakpoint to your appDidFinishLaunchingWithOptions. At the console type in:

po [UIFont familyNames]

It brings you a full list of all the installed fonts so you can search for your font family name. After this copy that and paste into this snippet:

po [UIFont fontNamesForFamilyName:@”familyname”]

That should get your the font name you reference inside your code. Follow our iPhone news to find out more.

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